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the fiscal cliff but the president is responsible and wants the deal. he's been trying to negotiate by making reasonable concessions. lowered the revenue number. he's increased the tax limit from $250,000 to $400,000. the guy made all kinds of concessions. the republicans refuse to do anything to come to the table with a concession. that's not how you negotiate. the problem isn't the democrats. it's from my perspective, not surprised i will say this, we have a dysfunction congress, particularly the republicans in congress because on the house side they have a silly majority, the majority rule, which is nowhere in the constitution to have a majority of the majority. all you need is a majority of the house. and then in the senate side, willing to filibuster. nothing in the constitution saying you need 60 votes to pass anything. this is anti-democratic. let's get a deal done. the american people need this and won't blame the president. they'll blame the people who aren't willing to make a compromise. >> this is something we know that our elected leader haves to get done and don't have hope for g
the can down the road, jeff, we'll do some small deal and create another fiscal cliff to deal with this fiscal cliff. >> just let the people's housework its will. instead of handing over the keys to the most extreme elements in the house republican caucus. >> a lot of people donnell realize he is blocking a vote in the house. >> i think in the end we'll get a deal. the question is the timing. >> i am hopeful there will be a deal that avoids the worst parts of the fiscal cliff. >> i want to bring you in and say good morning to sander levin. sir, it's good to have you with me. what is your expectations or thoughts about hear that the president and vice president joe biden are calling the four congressional leaders behind closed closed doors today. >> i am hopeful. i wouldn't say i'm optimistic, but i think confidence has gone down. i think the key is whether the speaker will be the speaker of the entire house and let the matters come before us where there could be a majority of democrats and perhaps a majority of republicans, but let es speak our will and act on our will. that's
months. the reason donors are concerned that a fiscal cliff deal could limit the tax deduction on charitable giving in the future. >> good day to you. is that the reason? i think people are worried they won't know what the deduction listen next we're, so front-loading the deduction this year. hopefully it's my wish they don't reduce it at all. >> let's look at some of the numbers. each year 300 billion is given to charity and claim about 50 billion a year in tax deductions. so when you look at some of the numbers, a person making about $too,000, they can deduct 35%. if that were to go down to 28%, how much do you think that would impact giving? >> you know, the estimate is anywhere between 1 and 30 billi billion, depending on how the deduction goes, and even if it's eliminated. it's hard to predict. one of the important things is this deduction han in place since 1917, and no one has ever touched it before. so we have no data on what's going to happen, but i think the americans, three quarters of the americans are concerned it will reduce the money to charity. >>> you know, if
. >> but, first, don't go looking up the chimney for a deal on the fiscal cliff. there are just eight days, that's it, until the deadline to reach a deal, and there was little progress as lawmakers left town for the holiday. before the president took off for his hawaiian vacation with his family on friday, he pressured kfshs to pass a smaller deal, to delay those automatic spending cuts and to extend tax cuts for all except for the wealthiest of americans. now, while senators on both sides of the aisle, they spoke in support of at least a smaller deal on sunday. joe lieberman seemed to have less hope. >> it's the first time that i feel that it's more likely that we will go over the cliff than not, and that if we allow that to happen, it will be the most colossal consequential act of congressional irresponsibility in a long time. maybe ever in american history because of the impact it will have on almost every american. >> kristen welker is nbc's white house correspondent, also traveling with the president in honolulu. kristen, explain to all of us because it appears the lights are out in w
. >> 30 hours to go until the country hits the fiscal cliff and still no deal. i'm melissa rayberger, and the white house has sent one of its top negotiators to capitol hill, but right now it's all centered on the senate, and as democrats dig in to protect social programs, republicans do the same on taxes. >> raising taxes to pay for new spending is not something that republicans believe this debate ought to be about. it ought to be about reducing the deficit and the debt, and what they are essentially suggesting is we want new taxes. we want higher taxes on people in this country to pay for new spending. >> so what happens next? with us nbc news capitol hill correspondent mike vic rah and nbc news white house correspondent kristen welker. mike, let's get started with you. what's happening right now in the senate. i understand there's an update on the chained cpi. >> reporter: they say the darkest hour right before the dawn, melissa. everybody ought to hope that's true, at least if you don't want to see your taxes go up on midnight on monday and tuesday night because everything seems
>>> 6:00 on the east coast. just 30 hours remain before the country goes over the fiscal cliff, and we're still waiting for a deal. good evening. i'm chris jansing. the senate is going home for tonight. democratic and republican leaders had hoped to reach an agreement by 3:00 this afternoon. >> i was really glad to hear republicans have taken their demand for social security benefit cuts off the table. the truth is, it should never have been on the table to begin with. there's still significant distance between the two sides, but negotiations continue. there's still time left to reach an agreement, and we intend to continue negotiations. i ask unanimous content that the senate proceed tomorrow morning. >> earlier, they took to the floor to explain the setback in negotiations this morning. >> i'm concerned about the lack of urgency here. i think we all know we're running out of time. this is far too much at stake for political gamesmanship. the consequences of this are too high for the american people to be engaged in a political messaging campaign. i'm interested in getting a r
a deal to avert the fiscal cliff crisis. at this point, the approaching deadline can be measured in hours, and expectations are being scaled down accordingly. >> i suggested to them, if they can't do a comprehensive package of smart deficit reduction, let's, at minimum, make sure people's taxes don't go up. >> the president appearing on "meet the press" this morning, pushing a narrow last-minute deal that would extend the bush tax cuts for the middle class but leave a hoet of other issues unresolved. if congress does reach a small deal on taxes before the fiscal cliff deadlines up, their next fight over the dead ceiling will be queued up and ready to go. whether or not we go over the fiscal cliff tomorrow night, a political stand-off over the debt ceiling is imminent. joining us sort through all of this current and future fiscal crises is ezra klein. at "the washington post" as well as columnist for bloomberg view. thanks for joining us. you addressed the issue of what happens next, i saw you on rachel's show friday. your theory are it's key to how the fiscal cliff plays out. explain. >>
to reach a deal, the impact is as unlikely as immediate as the term "fiscal cliff" seems to imply. the expiration of the tax cuts with a $2200 average tax high. the payroll tax cut would also expire meaning another $40 a paycheck and long-term unemployment benefits would end for 2 million americans. while these elements could have a recession-inducing effect, they could undo those measures shortly after the first of the year. estimations are if we do go over the cliff it would be the third quarter which the recession may hit. when be look at the issue of a -- the markets, however, may feel the brunt of the fiscal cliff fallout. the dow fell on friday after the deal failed the night before. last week fitch warned it may downgrade the u.s. credit rating if congress cannot reach a deal. some lawmakers are angling for the best political outcountry. >> when i listen to the president, i think he's eager to go over the cliff for political purposes. he gets all this additional tax revenue for new programs, gets to cut the military which democrats have been calling for for years, and he ge
're keeping our eye on the senate back in session with the fiscal cliff talks now down to the wire. the big question is even if the senate reaches a deal as they continue the debate will republicans pass anything with tax hikes in the house? up next republican congressman tom cole. and baby makes three. kim kardashian and kanye west's big baby announcement. also, sydney, australia celebrating the new year just three hours ago with fireworks over the famous opera house. in new york city, an already crowded times square. people waking up there. our big question what is your new year's resolution for 2013? tweet me at richard lui. we'll share some of your comments later. >>> a live look at the markets which appear to be taking going over the fiscal cliff in stride. many people say it is built into the market. many investors are still confident leaders will strike some sort of deal as talks go down to the wire and even if they don't they are counting on senate majority leader harry reid to present a backup proposal to limit some of the damage. we're watching live pictures on the right-hand side
of even short-term deal to avoid going over that fiscal cliff on january 1. so no surprise the market's in negative territory. you've got the numbers right there in front of us right from the opening. now, on the flip side the markets had priced in some kind of a deal and that's why post election day we had seen the markets overall going up. but right now make no mistake about it, the fiscal cliff doubts in getting to january 1 without some kind of even a patchwork deal is what's driving the markets right now in negative territory. >> as we know, it's not a cliff, it's really a slope or series of steps as you're falling down them should a deal not come to pass here. is the drop that we've seen so far after plan b's failure, will we see yet more of the market reacting, a slow degradation of market performance? >> that depends on essentially if, for instance, a week from monday right now we're sitting here and it's almost a certainty that we're going to go over the cliff. i would argue that we could get more back to a cliff rather than slope analogy because it comes down to how swiftly
to continue to drive me. and i think that the issue that we're dealing with right now in the fiscal cliff is a prime example of it. what i'm arguing for are maintaining tax cuts for 98% of americans. i don't think anybody would consider that some liberal left-wing agenda. that used to be considered a pretty mainstream republican agenda. and it's something that we can accomplish today, if we simply allow for a vote in the senate and in the house to get it done. the fact that it's not happening is an indication of you know, how far certain factions inside the republican party have gone where they, they can't even accept what used to be considered centrist mainstream positions on these issues. now i remain optimistic, i'm just a congenital optimist, that eventually people kind of see the light. winston churchill used to say that we americans, we try every other option before we finally do the right thing. after everything else is exhausted, we eventually do the right thing. and i think that that's true for congress as well. and i think it's also important for americans to remember that polit
the answers in minutes. >>> we start with optimism as a last words that comes to mind with the fiscal cliff and with just a week left for talks left, la lawmakers are saying a deal is looking less likely than ever. >> it's a first time i feel it's more likely that we'll go over the cliff than not. and that -- if we allow that to happen it will be the most coloss colossal, consequential act of congressional irresponsibility in a long time. maybe ever in american history because of the immaterial pact on almost every single american. >> what will happen to an average american paycheck in a deal is not reached by january 1st? joining me now, washington bureau correspondent hampton pearson. let's see what the average american will or won't be seeing in their pi check. >> reporter: i'm here for the lump of coal portion of the program. if there's no deal, let's look at what happens to tax rates in just seven days and these stats are from the tax policy center. the annual income from somebody in the $50,000 to $75,000, about a $2,400 increase. jumping ahead to $100,000 to $200,000, the average tax
before we go over the so-called fiscal cliff. senate leaders spent the weekend working on a last-ditch deal, and the house comes back for a rare sunday night session. yesterday afternoon in an exclusive interview, president obama sat down with me in the blue room of the white house to discuss the way forward and his priorities for a second term. >>> mr. president, welcome back to "meet the press." >> great to be here. thank you. >> the obvious question, are we going to go over the fiscal cliff? >> we'll find out in the next 48 hours what congress will decide to do. but i think it's important for the american people to understand exactly what this fiscal cliff is. it's actually not that complicated. the tax cuts that were introduced in 2001, 2003, 2010, those were extended, and they are all about to expire at the end of the year. so on midnight december 31, if congress doesn't act, then everybody's taxes go up. and for the average family, that could mean a loss of $2,000 in income. for the entire economy, that means consumers have a lot less money to make purchases, which means bu
vacation for the hard reality of the fiscal cliff negotiations. the president called all four congressional leaders last night in an effort to reach a deal, but did that call fall on deaf ears? jared bernstein, former chief economist to vip biden, as well as a contributor. i want to start with the new statement from senator mitch mcconnell's office coming out says last night he called other lead serious. the leader is happy to review what the president has in mind, but to day date the majority has not put forward a plan. jared, is that good they're actually speaking, however far apart as it may sound, at least they're talking? >> it's a bit good. better to be talking than north. the unfortunate thing are the words they're saying. i don't hear much compromise or kind of conciliation in the statements we've heard thus far. i do hear a lot of theatrics, you go first, no you go first. it's strange to say the democrats haven't put forth any legislation on this, because in fact they have. in fact, a democratic majority in the senate passed a bill that's pretty similar to the compromise that the p
>>> maybe eight days and counting before a fiscal cliff. will a shift too the senate save the day? then paradise lost. will president obama leave hawaii behind the day after christmas if a deal is in the works and the election hangover. new comments from one of mitt romney's sons that you might describe as puzzling. what do they really mean? and the gun battle rages on. new reports on why nothing may get done even after the sandy hook tragedy. >>> a massive tax hike and spending cuts -- republicans and democrats continue to point fingers in opposite directions, hinting that talks could go into the new year. >> are we going over the cliff? >> i believe we are, and i think the president is eager to go over the cliff for political purposes. he senses a victory at the bottom of the cliff. >> we only have nine days left here. when are we going to get serious about actual solutions? i would welcome john to tell me. he says he wants a solution. give us one, john. >> meanwhile, president obama is spending christmas in hawaii where he and the first lady attended the holiday memorial servic
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15